Blythmoor Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

Senior Does Bucks 2015 Kids
Junior Does Breeding Schedule Reference Does Milk - DHIA and Info

 

Blythmoor participates in the ADGA Plus program. The Blythmoor herd is performance tested annually for milk (DHIA), Linear Appraisal and DNA typing.

We are located in the mid-Willamette Valley, near Independence, Oregon. Our small acreage is ideal for our small goats. Besides the enjoyment of these lovely animals, our goal is to breed top quality milking Nigerians that will be equally at home on the farm and in the show ring.

Please email (more reliable) or phone (971-218-0064) if you are interested in one of my goats, or would like more information.

 

NEWS -- 2015 Oregon State Fair PREMIER BREEDER!!!

NEW CHAMPION: SGCH Blythmoor HW Spice 2*M earned her last Grand over 79 milkers, at age 8.

 

A Few things about Blythmoor Nigerians......

Blythmoor does are typically linebred, which leads to consistency. My initial does were actually outcrossed with GCH Mystic Acres Snapdragon and Blythmoor Spice, which turned out to be a phenomenal cross. Almost my entire herd is based on these two animals -- crossing back and forth and using some nice bucks to outcross when I need to do that. Consequently, I know pretty much what I'm going to get -- and buyers know what they are going to get also. Since I am not good at pictures, I will try to be as descriptive as possible with each animal.


I don't select for color or blue eyes or polled goats. I have my favorite colors, don't like blue eyes particularly, love polled.... but they don't figure into any selections I make pro or con. I breed for good quality milking Nigerians, focused on the home milker rather than just awards (although those are nice too). The Nigerian standard says "The balanced proportions of the Nigerian Dwarf gives it the appearance of the larger breeds of dairy goats...." This is the "look" that I strive for. I want there to be no mistake that these are Nigerians and not Pygmy's.

Balance in all things! When I look at my goats, I want to see an animal that is structurally correct from front to rear, balanced, level, long. To me, that is true beauty. I really dislike sloped rumps, so tend to very much select against that -- and consequently have nice rear structure in my herd. Since I started in Nigerians, and taking the advice of a very good appraiser, my goal has been to breed for the whole goat -- not just the udder. A good udder is part of the overall balance. But if I find myself with a good udder on a bad goat, that doesn't stay in my herd.

Size: The Nigerian Dwarf standard for breeding states that it is a disqualifying fault for does to be over 22 1/2" and bucks to be over 23 1/2". I do not keep or breed animals outside of those standards and have noted where they appear in my pedigrees. Recently the Nigerian breed has fallen into a trap of thinking that overly high withers are "dairy" and we excuse an OH animal because he's "very dairy". Excessive height to the wither is not dairy, it's just wrong. And it's wrong even if they are not too tall. This recent trend is something I also avoid.

Because I'm breeding for good milkers that will do well on the family mini-farm, my does are not on a special ration. This means a little less milk in the pail, but they still do very well. The milkers get some alfalfa, sometimes, and a bit of grain on the milk stand, but they are expected to graze for the bulk of their nutrition when the pastures are in their prime. Here in the Willamette Valley we typically have nice lush pastures. Of course they get more supplemental hay/alfalfa when pastures dry out in late summer and fall, and when pastures have less nutritional value during the peak of winter. For the most part, I have lovely green, mixed pastures, with grass and browse, that sustains them well for a good portion of the year.

 

 

HIGHLIGHTS

 

Blythmoor Winning Colors *M, earned her milk star by virtue of three daughters with stars. Winny died way before I started doing milk test.
All my does have earned milk stars as yearlings or 2 year olds. Mostly on butterfat although they meet production minimums as they mature.

Daughters of Winning Colors: SGCH Blythmoor HW Spice 2*M (LA90), Blythmoor Sugar 2*M (LA 88)and Blythmoor Everything Nice 2*M (LA87)

SPICE is the foundation of my herd, with some nice does also out of her half sister (sire) SGCH Blythmoor Almond Joy 3*M

I do Linear Appraisal every year. See doe pages for scores.


S
GCH Blythmoor SS Samse 3*M (LA 89)
and her daughter, Blythmoor QS Zenyatta 4*M



Blythmoor Grace O'Malley 4*M LA 86 deserves mention. She was a stunning doe that died (ate poison plants) in 2014. Her offspring still figure in my herd.

 

No Longer owned by Blythmoor, these does are working hard for other herds:

SG Blythmoor Mulberry 2*M (LA84) (dam of GCH Almond Joy)
Blythmoor Knock Knock Penny - LA 86 as yearling milker
Blythmoor Leilani - LA 87 as yearling
Blythmoor Anne Bonney - LA87 as yearling (Grace's daughter)
SG Blythmoor Hyacinth
SG Blythmoor Sangria (LA 89)
Blythmoor Gingersnap (LA88

BUCKS -- Blythmoor Tanqueray LA 88




OTHER BRAGS

2013
**** GrCH Blythmoor SS Samse, 3*M ******
SWWDGA -Reserve GrCH
Idaho Syringa - 2 x GrCH, BOB and BUofBreed over 5 finished does
NWODGA - BOB and Best Udder of Breed

NWODGA 2013 Nigerian Specialty
1st place - Best Three Senior Does
1st place - Senior Produce of Dam
2nd Place - Dam & Daughter (senior)

LINN COUNTY FAIR - 2012
Blythmoor SS Samse - Reserve GrCH
Best Dam/Daughter (Samse/Spice)
Second Dam/Daughter/Granddaughter
Best Produce of Dam (Spice's girls)
Best Breeder Trio

NWODGA Show - 2012
Samse was GrCh and BOB in 2 rings


Blythmoor HW Spice - Best Udder in Breed at Linn County Fair